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  • All fields: lek
(12 results)



Display: 20

    • Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)

    • Birds; Endangered and/or threatened; Threatened species; Relocation; Habitat restoration; Partnerships; Military
    • The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) was first described by Lewis and Clark in 1805. Its original territory spanned over a dozen states throughout the western region of the United States. Currently, greater sagegrouse occur in...
    • Land protection plan: Bear River Watershed Conservation Area

    • Wildlife refuges; Water; Water management; Land development;
    • The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is establishing a conservation area for the Bear River watershed in Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming. The Bear River Water-shed Conservation Area project will work with private landowners to establish up to 920,000 acres...
    • Fritz Knopf oral history transcript

    • Employees (USFWS); Biography; Riparian environments; Military; Habitat conservation; Birds; Biologists (USFWS); Prairies; History
    • Fritz Knopf oral history interview as conducted by John Cornely. Fritz worked at the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Denver Wildlife Research Center starting in 1980. Since then the Center has undergone several name changes and was part...
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse display

    • Birds; Prairies; Wildlife refuges;
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse display to attract females on communal dancing grounds, called leks. The male provides no parental care. A female may visit a lek up to 10 or more times, and she may sample two different leks.
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse display

    • Birds; Prairies; Wildlife refuges;
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse display to attract females on communal dancing grounds, called leks. The male provides no parental care. A female may visit a lek up to 10 or more times, and she may sample two different leks.
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse display

    • Birds; Prairies; Wildlife refuges;
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse display to attract females on communal dancing grounds, called leks. The male provides no parental care. A female may visit a lek up to 10 or more times, and she may sample two different leks.
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse

    • Birds; Prairies; Wildlife refuges;
    • A pair of male Sharp-tailed Grouse display to attract females on communal dancing grounds, called leks. The male provides no parental care. A female may visit a lek up to 10 or more times, and she may sample two different leks.
    • Sharp-tailed Grouse

    • Birds; Prairies; Wildlife refuges;
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse display to attract females on communal dancing grounds, called leks. The male provides no parental care. A female may visit a lek up to 10 or more times, and she may sample two different leks.
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse display

    • Birds; Prairies; Wildlife refuges;
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse display to attract females on communal dancing grounds, called leks. The male provides no parental care. A female may visit a lek up to 10 or more times, and she may sample two different leks.
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse display

    • Birds; Prairies; Wildlife refuges;
    • Male Sharp-tailed Grouse display to attract females on communal dancing grounds, called leks. The male provides no parental care. A female may visit a lek up to 10 or more times, and she may sample two different leks.

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