Skip to main content

Add or remove other collections to your search:



Narrow your search by:



You've searched: All Collections

  • All fields: butterflies
(175 results)



Display: 20

    • 2012 Annual Report: youth in the great outdoors

    • Work of the Service; Youth; Education outreach; Environmental education; Volunteers; Connecting people with nature; Employees (USFWS); Leisure activities; Partnerships;
    • Engaging, educating, and employing our nation’s youth in conservation are major priorities for the Department of the Interior (Department), and in 2009 the Youth in the Great Outdoors (YGO) initiative was established.
    • Conservation profiles: landowners help imperiled wildlife

    • Work of the Service; Conservation; Land development; Landscape conservation; Policies;
    • The purpose of this brochure is to introduce some of the landowners who are using two innovative conservation tools: Safe Harbor Agreements and Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances. Although these tools only came into use within the...
    • Butterflies of the last oasis sign

    • Wildlife refuges; Work of the Service; Wildlife viewing; Interpretation; Visitor services; Exhibits; Deserts;
    • Situated in central-western Arizona along the Lower Colorado River, the Bill Williams River extends a short 40 miles before emptying into the Colorado River at Lake Havasu. A portion of the river and its unique habitat are protected within the Bill...
    • Dragonfly flitting on a small branch

    • Wildlife Refuges; Aquatic environments; Predators; Insects;
    • Dragonflies are important predators that eat mosquitoes, and other small insects like flies, bees, ants, wasps, and very rarely butterflies. They are usually found around marshes, lakes, ponds, streams, and wetlands
    • DRAFT guidance on selecting species for design of landscape-scale conservation

    • Surrogate species; Species of concern; Conservation science; Conservation; Planning; Scientific personnel (USFWS); Biologists (USFWS); Strategic habitat conservation; Adaptive management; Climate change
    • The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and its State, Federal, and Tribal government partners are entrusted by law with conserving, protecting, and enhancing fish and wildlife and their habitats for the American people. Together, we work with...
    • Milkweed pods and seeds at NCTC

    • Insects;
    • Common Milkweed is an important plant because so many species of insects depend on it. Monarch Butterflies, Milkwee Bugs, and Milkweed Leaf Beetles only eat milkweed, and could not survive without it. Many other species of insects use milkweed as...
    • Milkweed bugs feasting on milkweed

    • Insects; Plants; Flowering plants;
    • Common Milkweed is an important plant because so many species of insects depend on it. Monarch Butterflies, Milkweed Bugs, and Milkweed Leaf Beetles only eat milkweed, and could not survive without it. Many other species of insects use milkweed as...
    • Monarch butterflies

    • Insects; Biological control; Habitat conservation; Flowering plants; Ecosystem recovery; Habitat restoration; Tagging; Research;
    • Monarch butterfly population overwintering in Pacific Grove, California. Blue tags on butterflies. North American monarchs travel up to an astonishing 3,000 miles in an annual migration from their summer breeding habitat to overwintering grounds.
    • Monarch butterflies

    • Insects; Biological control; Habitat conservation; Flowering plants; Ecosystem recovery; Habitat restoration; Tagging; Research;
    • Monarch butterfly population overwintering in Pacific Grove, California. Blue tags on butterflies. North American monarchs travel up to an astonishing 3,000 miles in an annual migration from their summer breeding habitat to overwintering grounds.
    • Monarch butterflies

    • Insects; Biological control; Habitat conservation; Flowering plants; Ecosystem recovery; Habitat restoration; Tagging; Research;
    • Monarch butterfly population overwintering in Pacific Grove, California. Blue tags on butterflies. North American monarchs travel up to an astonishing 3,000 miles in an annual migration from their summer breeding habitat to overwintering grounds.
    • Monarch butterflies

    • Insects; Biological control; Habitat conservation; Flowering plants; Ecosystem recovery; Habitat restoration; Tagging; Research;
    • Monarch butterfly population overwintering in Pacific Grove, California. Blue tags on butterflies. North American monarchs travel up to an astonishing 3,000 miles in an annual migration from their summer breeding habitat to overwintering grounds.
    • Monarch butterflies

    • Insects; Biological control; Habitat conservation; Flowering plants; Ecosystem recovery; Habitat restoration; Research; Landscape conservation; Tagging;
    • Monarch butterfly population overwintering in Pismo Beach, California. North American monarchs travel up to an astonishing 3,000 miles in an annual migration from their summer breeding habitat to overwintering grounds.

QuickView

Display a larger image and more item information when the pointer pauses over a thumbnail
 

Layout options:

Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK