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  • All fields: birch
(88 results)



Display: 20

    • Moose In U.S. Fish and Wildlife Parking Lot

    • Work of the Service; Moose; Regional Office; Winter; Mammals; Anchorage; Alaska; Employees (USFWS)
    • Employees at the Region 7 (Alaska) Regional Office in mid-town Anchorage, must use caution when entering or exiting the building during the long winter months. Moose often times are found bedded down near the parking lot or browsing on birch trees...
    • Colorful birch leaves

    • Wildlife refuges; Trees; Scenics;
    • Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge was established to conserve white-fronted geese, other waterfowl and migratory birds, moose, caribou, and furbearers; to fulfill treaty obligations; to provide for continued subsistence uses; and to ensure necessary...
    • Using plants as indicators of wetlands

    • Wetlands; Wetland restoration; Management; Conservation; Maps; Work of the Service; Wildlife refuges;
    • This document uses the primary indicator approach to identifying wetlands.
    • Classification of wetlands and deepwater habitats of the United States

    • Wetlands; Ecosystem recovery; Estuarine environments; Floods; Habitat conservation;
    • This classification, to be used in a new inventory of wetlands and deepwater habitats of the United States, is intended to describe ecological tax, arrange them in a system useful to resource managers, furnish units for mapping, and provide...
    • Birch tree in forest at Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge

    • Trees; Forests; Mountains; Wildlife refuges;
    • The Alaska Highway is the northern boundary of the 682,604 acre Tetlin Refuge for 65 miles northwest of Alaska-Yukon border. From scenic overlooks you can view wetlands important to breeding waterfowl, and boreal forests and alpine habitats...
    • Tree with peeling bark

    • Rivers and streams; Trees; Wildlife refuges; Scenics;
    • Paper birch also called Canoe birch (Betula papyrifera). Peeling birch is used for specialty products such as ice cream sticks, toothpicks, and toys. Indians made their lightweight, birchbark canoes by stretching the stripped bark over frames,...
    • Birch tree

    • Plants; Trees;
    • Close view of birch tree with bark taken August 2006 in Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge (KNWR).
    • John Kurtz oral history transcript

    • Military; Biography; History; Employees (USFWS); Youth; Recreation; Management; Hiking; Wilderness; Work of the Service; Wildlife refuges; Public access; Planning;
    • John Kurtz oral history transcript as conducted by Norman Olson. John Kurtz also spent time in the Phoenix Area Office in charge of refuges in Arizona and New Mexico. He also worked as supervisor for the northern refuges in Alaska.
    • Bull moose

    • Mammals
    • A bull moose stands under birch tree near building and car.
    • Reed Coleman oral history transcript

    • History; Biography; Preservation (Specimens); Landscape conservation; Habitat conservation; Hunting; History; Education;
    • Reed Coleman oral history interview as conducted by Mark Madison and Steve Laubach. Reed mainly talks about the Leopold Memorial Reserve, how it got started, who helped start it and various aspects of the Reserve.
    • Bella Francis oral history transcript

    • History; Biography; Fishing; Forests; Hunting; Indigenous populations; Native Americans; Trapping; Villages; Wilderness;
    • Oral history interview with Bella Francis and Roger Kaye as interviewer.
    • Kent Olson oral history transcript

    • History; Biography; Employees (USFWS); Wetlands; Waterfowl; Biologists (USFWS); Interpretation; Islands; Wildlife management;
    • Kent Olson oral history interview as conducted by Jonathan Schafler. Kent also worked with the Wetland Acquisition Program and at River Basins as a biologist.
    • Bill and Jean Thomas oral history transcript

    • History; Biography; Camping; Hunting;
    • Bill and Jean Thomas oral history interview with Roger Kaye. Note that Mr. and Mrs. Thomas were not Fish and Wildlife Service employees, but were long time residents of the Upper Porcupine and Upper Black Rivers in Alaska.

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