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  • All fields: 2010-09-12
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Display: 20

    • Bird carcass documentation

    • Bird carcass documentation
    • Oil spills; Employees (USFWS); Surveying;
    • July 15, 2010 Gulfport, MS - Mississippi Team One - USFWS Biologist Nate Caswell documents location of a dead gull with no visible oil. Photo by Bonnie Strawser.
    • Bird carcass documentation

    • Bird carcass documentation
    • Oil spills; Employees (USFWS); Surveying;
    • July 15, 2010 Gulfport, MS - Mississippi Team One consists of USFWS Biologist Nate Caswell and USFS Biologist Joe Metzmeier. Their assignment was a long day on Ship Island in Gulf Islands National Seashore. Photo by Bonnie Strawser.
    • Bird carcass report

    • Bird carcass report
    • Oil spills; Employees (USFWS); Surveying;
    • July 15, 2010 Gulfport, MS - Mississippi Team One consists of USFWS Biologist Nate Caswell and USFS Biologist Joe Metzmeier. Their assignment was a long day on Ship Island in Gulf Islands National Seashore. Immediately upon arrival, a dead gull was...
    • Bird carcass report

    • Bird carcass report
    • Oil spills; Employees (USFWS); Surveying;
    • July 15, 2010 Gulfport, MS - Mississippi Team One USFWS Biologist Nate Caswell. Meticulous recordkeeping is a necessity. Photo by Bonnie Strawser.
    • Bird carcass report

    • Bird carcass report
    • Oil spills; Employees (USFWS); Surveying;
    • July 15, 2010 Gulfport, MS - Mississippi Team One consists of USFWS Biologist Nate Caswell and USFS Biologist Joe Metzmeier. Their assignment was a long day on Ship Island in Gulf Islands National Seashore. National Geographic Reporter Fritz...
    • Bon Secour Maintenance worker Jerry Dunn

    • Bon Secour Maintenance worker Jerry Dunn
    • Oil spills; Employees (USFWS);
    • July 1, 2010 Gulf Shores, AL - Most marsh areas are protected by boom. Since the spill began, Bon Secour Maintenance worker Jerry Dunn routinely checks the shoreline/boom three times a week. Photo by Bonnie Strawser.
    • Carcass collection

    • Carcass collection
    • Oil spills; Employees (USFWS); Reptiles; Relocation;
    • July 15, 2010 Ship Island, AL - National Geographic Reporter Fritz Faerber video-tapes US Forest Service Biologist Joe Metzmeier as he documents details of a carcass collection. Photo by Bonnie Strawser, USFWS
    • Coast Guard transports rehabilitated pelicans

    • Coast Guard transports rehabilitated pelicans
    • Aircraft; Birds; Oil spills; Relocation; Partnerships;
    • On June 23, 2010, the United States Coast Guard arrived at Signature Flight Airport, New Orleans in two HC-144 cargo planes to transport 63 rehabilitated pelicans to Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in Texas.
    • FWS employee

    • FWS employee
    • Oil spills; Employees (USFWS);
    • Faithful Leader for the Field folks of the Wildlife Operations Branch July 1-15, 2010. Photo by Bonnie Strawser, USFWS
    • FWS employees inspect shoreline

    • FWS employees inspect shoreline
    • Oil spills; Employees (USFWS);
    • July 1, 2010 Gulf Shores, AL - Most marsh areas are protected by boom. Since the spill began, Bon Secour Maintenance worker Jerry Dunn routinely checks the shoreline/boom three times a week. Photo by Bonnie Strawser.
    • Ghost crab

    • Ghost crab
    • Oil spills; Crustaceans;
    • July 1, 2010, Gulf Shores, AL Ghost Crab at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. These crabs are among the top predators on both sea turtle eggs and hatchlings. Photo by Bonnie Strawser, USFWS
    • Helicopter reconnaissance flight

    • Helicopter reconnaissance flight
    • Oil spills; Meetings; Personnel;
    • "July 2010 - New Orleans. Randy Wilson and Paul Yakupzack, refuge manager at Mandalay/Bayou Teche National Wildlife Refuge in Louisiana, prepare to board a helicopter for a reconnaissance flight. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS"
    • Laughing gulls

    • Laughing gulls
    • Birds; Shorebirds; Wildlife refuges;
    • Laughing gulls are another type of shorebird that call Breton National Wildlife Refuge their seasonal home. Photo by Donna A. Dewhurst.
    • Manatee swims close to the surface

    • Manatee swims close to the surface
    • Mammals; Marine mammals; Oil spills;
    • Manatees swim close to the surface and frequently come up for air. They also come to Florida in the summer months. Manatees will probably run into the oil spill in the Gulf, and there could be very serious results.

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