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    • What benefits do inspectors earn? Wildlife inspectors enjoy all the benefits of Federal employment, including a generous retirement plan with substantial investment opportunities. Inspectors earn 13 to 26 days of annual leave each year depending on...
    • A Texas Rancher Who Became a Believer

    • A Texas Rancher Who Became a Believer
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    • 6 A Texas Cattle Rancher Who “ Became a Believer” “ We’re just ‘ wildlifing’ it all over the place, and we’re happy to do it,” Bob Long said. Long is enhancing habitat on his 550- acre property to benefit the Houston toad, an...
    • Private Stewardship Grants

    • Private Stewardship Grants
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    • 19 Private Stewardship Grants What are the benefits? For the landowner: Allows private landowners to submit project proposals directly to the Fish and Wildlife Service and offers a low cost- share ratio to assist landowners in...
    • Autumn Aerial of the National Conservation Training Center

    • Autumn Aerial of the National Conservation Training Center
    • Aerial photography; Buildings, facilities and structures; Education; Rivers and streams; Training;
    • Aerial view of the National Conservation Training Center, showing the facility buildings and roads, the Potomac River with low clouds and surrounding woodlands. For more information about the Training Center visit http://training.fws.gov .
    • Western tanager

    • Western tanager
    • animals; aves; Birds; Birds; Deshutes National Forests; Oregon; passerines; neotropical migrant; Migratory birds
    • First recorded on the Lewis and Clark expedition (1803-1806), the Western tanager prefers open forested areas at low elevations. The male has a vivid colored red head, bright yellow body with striking black wings and tail.
    • Grizzly Bear in Yellowstone National Park

    • Grizzly Bear in Yellowstone National Park
    • bear; Endangered species;Yellowstone National Park; Mammals; Wyoming;
    • This image is available for public domain use in this low resolution file, but for higher resolution files please contact Terry Tollefsbol @ TTollefsbol@CooperBussmann.com
    • Screech owl

    • Screech owl
    • Birds; Birds of prey;
    • Close view of owl in tree with wings spread, viewed from low front..
    • Eskimo curlew

    • Eskimo curlew
    • Birds; Endangered species; Shorebirds; History;
    • Black and white image of Eskimo curlew standing on one leg in low vegetation.
    • Northern mockingbird

    • Northern mockingbird
    • Birds; Migratory birds; Perching birds;
    • Bird perched in Juniper tree with blue Juniper berry in mouth, viewed from low on side.
    • Logan Cave National Wildlife Refuge

    • Logan Cave National Wildlife Refuge
    • Caves;Riparian environments;Wildlife refuges;
    • Cave interior at the Refuge; flowing water with low ceiling and many small stalactites. For more information about this refuge visit http://www.fws.gov/southeast/LoganCave/.
    • Bishops Beach at low tide

    • Bishops Beach at low tide
    • Connecting people with nature; Recreation; Scenics; Coastal environments; Mountains;
    • Scenic view of Bishops Beach at Kachemak Bay near Cook Inlet in Homer, Alaska.
    • FWS Workers with Wood Stork Chick

    • FWS Workers with Wood Stork Chick
    • Endangered species; Birds; Harris Neck NWR; Georgia; Wildlife management
    • Two FWS biologists tagging a wood stork. Wood storks are widespread in Central and South America, but declined to alarmingly low numbers in the United States. At the turn of the century, there were over 150,000 wood storks living in Florida,...
    • Flooding in the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    • Flooding in the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge
    • Erosion; Public access; Roads; Tourism; Visitor services; Water management; Weather impacts; Wildlife refuges;
    • Heavy rains in late December of 2010 caused flooding throughout the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. Here excess flood water flows out of a run off pipe flooding a low lying area in the refuge.
    • Flooding in the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    • Flooding in the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge
    • Erosion; Public access; Roads; Tourism; Visitor services; Water management; Weather impacts; Wildlife refuges;
    • Heavy rains in late December of 2010 caused flooding throughout the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. Here water flows out of a run off pipe flooding a low lying area in the refuge.

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